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Legislation By Anecdote - Accessory Dwelling Units in Bellingham

By On

“It was no accident that the Oxford Dictionaries’ word of the year in 2016 was “post-truth,” a condition where facts are less influential in shaping opinion than emotion and personal belief. To adopt post-truth thinking is to depart from Enlightenment ideas, dominant in the West since the 17th century, that value experience and expertise, the centrality of fact, humility in the face of complexity, the need for study and a respect for ideas.” Michael V. Hayden

It is a rare moment when I look to the former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency for an appropriate quote, but present times call for logic from any source. Having been an intelligence analyst for decades, I have to stick to the facts. Unfortunately, in our spasmodic sausage-making legislative process, anecdotes with appeals to emotion have taken over.

The self-identified YIMBYs (Yes In My Backyard) adopted a playbook that distorted the recent accessory dwelling unit (ADU) ordinance update by inserting appeals to emotion, rather than fact. They used this approach to create the not-so-subtle impression that those who would oppose their stance on ADUs were the bad guys and worse: exclusionary, racist, privileged, gray-haired, white and villainous.

This tactic arose early in the public ADU debate with the appearance of the strategy document Bellingham Housing Affordability and Livability Working Assessement + Proposal from the office of the Associated Students (AS) at Western Washington University. The paper states, “Assessing the problem before moving to solutions makes sense. In our case, the problem has already been assessed; a shortage of affordable housing units.” I beg your pardon; such a statement is not an assessment of the problem, it merely states the problem. The problem remains one of “discovery.” We need a method of evaluating the contributing factors and THEN devising measurable actions to realize stated goals and achieve an end: affordable housing. Even then, “affordable housing” must be defined or we end up in a circular argument. Interestingly, at no time did the Associated Students mention that their own university was complicit in creating the housing crisis in the city by not building any on-campus dormitories for over 40 years in spite of increasing enrollment by 50% over that time. So much for assessing the problem and its origins.

The Associated Students “assessment” then reveals the tactic of the “steamroller,” an “unapologetic YIMBY, who fights for our values, holds elected officials accountable, pushes the progressive frame [bolding mine] and is unwilling to compromise.” And who is it that determined “our values?” Those values arose from the FIRE Sector (the Finance, Insurance and Real Estate industries) and from public relations outfits like the Frameworks Institute whose mission is to frame public discourse on policy issues. In this case, the Associated Students reframed the issue to their own benefit by crafting language that tugs at the hearts and souls of responsible citizens while avoiding the drudgery of working with facts.

The problem is that neither the Associated Students nor the YIMBYs even realize they have been co-opted and duped by such “value based” messaging. Who can resist a message ostensibly viewed through an “equity lens?” You can do anything in the name of equity. And heaven help those who oppose; those people become, as mentioned above, “exclusionary, racist, privileged, gray-haired, white and villainous.”

Many of these dubious tactics flow from the usually liberal Sightline Institute in Seattle, an organization that emphasizes sustainability, and one that you would probably not guess supports YIMBY groups that are determined to “build our way out of our housing availability and affordability problems.” The Sightline website offers to guide users with a number of what they call “flash cards.”

“…Flashcards are quick reference tools for effective communications strategies. They’re messaging memos distilled from experts and savvy communicators—to help you do your job and save you time. The Flashcards focus on values-based communication: strategies for talking about important policies or issue solutions in terms of shared values.”

One Flashcard entry suggests, “Data and research cannot be the message [bolding mine], rather, they should enhance and support a compelling alternative narrative.” The tactic is to reframe the issue for support of the agenda and not bother with facts regarding the specifics of where ADUs, or any other housing types for that matter, may have worked to achieve the desired ends.

Which brings us to the ultimate question: Where have ADUs worked to substantially affect the affordability or availability of housing? The answer is: nowhere. Talking points usually feature places where ADUs are being built, but there is no mention of their effectiveness in achieving any sort of measurable goal. Bellingham’s ADU Opportunities/Concerns matrix, developed by city staff as a comment tracker on the ADU ordinance review, responds to several comments by saying that ADUs are authorized in a number of different cities. What is not stated is whether the authorization of such ADUs is solving an identifiable problem. The French call this tactic “poudre aux yeux” (powder in the eyes). Dust off the matrix before reading.

As we continue our slide down the legislative razor blade this year, we will be confronted with several other land and zoning issues. The opposition or questioning of these will certainly occasion more reframing designed to vilify and divide. Updates to the subdivision ordinance, the re-look at “Infill Tool Kit” ordinance, the problem of illegal rooming houses, and the controversial vacation rental ordinance are each ripe for those wearing fogged-over equity lenses that lead them to stumble about, flailing for solutions to specific problems that have not been studied. Goals, actions, performance measures and review processes are, for all intents and purposes, non-existent. The cruel joke is on those who believe they are helping, or will be helped, by this reframing process as opposed to a well-planned and specifically articulated one.

About Dick Conoboy

Editor • Member since Jan 26, 2008

Dick Conoboy is a recovering civilian federal worker and military officer who was offered and accepted an all-expense paid, one year trip to Vietnam in 1968. He is a former Army [...]

Comments by Readers

Bryce Read

Jun 14, 2018

Well said, Mr. Conoboy!

Post Truth/LBA (Legislation By Anecdote) is certainly not limited to one side of the political spectrum, on this and many other issues.

You are indeed brave for saying so.

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Geoff Middaugh

Jun 14, 2018

Well said.  And sad.   Only two members of this city council had the political courage to challenge alternative facts.    I would also add:  where in any objective literature or analysis/assessment of the situation does zoning cause (not correlate, but cause) segregation.   Correlation is no causation.   I tried to point out in the book, The Color of Law, even this author provides background data that zoning as a cause of segregated neighborhoods ceased to be a factor in the late 1940’s.   Yet zoning is what is under siege, and once the single family zone is eliminated, all will be cured, and a fully egalitarian society grows from the legacy of economic disparity.   Balderdash. 

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Ronna Loerch

Jun 14, 2018

Loved the article.  Thanks Dick.  I have been following this issue from the “County” and thus peripherally.  I have sensed however much emotion and passion for the desired outcome of ADU allowances without truly studying the issue and working thorugh options.  I attended a session on the Vienna Model presented in Bellingham and was impressed by the thoughtful and hard work to make such a model thrive in cities throughout the world, mainly Europe.    This process, like many others by our local goernment did seem like a bit of a steamroller.  And there is soemthing lurking underneath it all having to do with the developers and real estate industries, happy as clams with the outcome.   So true about WWU and their inaction.  

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John Lesow

Jun 14, 2018

So WWU has not added any student housing in 40 years, despite an increase in enrollment of 50% ?   Compelling stat.    Thanks for the information.

 Another example of socializing the problems while privatizing the gains.  In this case,  the University is the culprit.   But no one would ever suggest that the rules of “Concurrency” apply to our hallowed academic institutions.   

This example is no different than the fact that the City of Vancouver, B.C. has not added ONE  new bridge lane to the Lions Gate and Second Narrows bridges since 1959.

 During that time period, the City has quadrupled in size.   These bridges are major transportation links (Trans-Canada Highway and Highway 99).  There are no other bridges planned or possible, given the costs. 

Concurrency?   I mentioned this idea at a transportation forum in Vancouver a year ago, provactively titled, “The Good, The Bad and the Bicycle”.

 None of the experts on the panel, which included a Mayor,  Urban Studies Prof, Bicycle Advocate (of course) and some other guy whose name and fancy position I forget was even familiar with the planning term, “Concurrency”.

Frustrating, eh ?

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Dick Conoboy

Jun 14, 2018

 Concurrency in Bellingham means that you look at solutions several years down the road.  Mitigation is also a much overstated concept which usually means that the wetlands you just built on can be mitigated by takin g afire hose and wetting down some neigbhoring property and all the flora and fauna will miraculously jump into the new pond.

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Geoff Middaugh

Jun 14, 2018

It’s interesting that the Whatcom Democrats are taking the position that WWU has zero impact on housing supply and affordability, without digging into the issue and understanding the subtlties of large student populatons without University provided housing.   Specifically, their Resolutions states as fact:    “WHEREAS, college students are not a significant factor driving steep rent and home price increases.”    Really?    And when this assumption is challenged, you are framed as anti-student, anti-young people, and no concern for affordability housing.   Really?  

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Dick Conoboy

Jun 17, 2018

Those who poo-poo the idea that WWU student renters are not a cause of the housing problem usually cite the fact that their numbers represent a relatively small percentage of the overall population of the city.  What is ignored is that most of these student renters want to live in the neighborhoods near the university which are already dense.  To truly measure their impact, their numbers should be considered as a percentage of residents in those neighborhoods.  Few at WWU want to live in Samish, Birchwood and Cordata that are not at the university’s front door. 

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John Lesow

Jun 17, 2018

Maybe this Resolution  will be addressed by prospective candidates in more detail at the Whatcom County League of Women Voters forum next Saturday.

 Let’s see who tackles the issue and who skates…

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